Friday 5 — 7.4.2014

Friday 5 — 7.4.2014
teens social media

Source: eMarketer, Niche

  1. What are the kids up to on the internet these days? A handy breakdown of reported social network usage by the high school class of 2014 reveals that Facebook is still a player with 61% of teens accessing at least once a day. Also, breaking news: Teens hide what they are doing online from their parents.
  2. Google search results linking to articles are disappearing in the European Union, courtesy of the recent “right to be forgotten” court decision. So your online search in the EU for someone’s name may not yield all the relevant results. Given the role of search, this is tantamount to removing articles from the public record.
  3. On a less Orwellian and more practical note, most of us have posted something on the internet they’ve later regretted. Here’s a useful how-to video on editing your own social media posts.
  4. David Carr notes both the exaggerated death and the “finite and recognizable” value of the email newsletter, which has undergone a recent renaissance of sorts. Jason Hirschhorn, author of the terrific Media ReDef, calls email “the cockroach of the Internet” for its ability to persist for over 40 years. Last year I referred to oft-eulogized email as a digital Rasputin.
  5. IFTTT (if this, then that) recipes are a great way for non-technical folks to tie together web services to create useful actions. For example, set up a recipe to send tweets that you favorite to Pocket, or to send you a text if it’s going to rain tomorrow. Combine that easy-to-use capability with the burgeoning internet of things, and life starts to get interesting. This week, a new partnership with Nest paves the way for users to create more useful and weird recipes of the physical world.

Weekend fun: OK, Go has served up another oddly addictive music video, full of optical illusions. But can you and your attention span still make it through a 3-minute video?

Every Friday, find five, highly subjective pointers to compelling technologies, emerging trends, and interesting ideas that affect how we live and work digitally.

 

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